Ranthambore Tiger Reserve in the Indian state of Rajasthan comprises distinct areas with varied conservation history and virtually separated geographically, with mere narrow corridors linking them to the core, Ranthambore National Park. These are mainly, the Ranthambore National Park, Keladevi Sanctuary and Sawai Mansingh Sanctuary.

The Ranthambore National Park, at the junction of the Aravallis and the Vindhyas, is a unique juxtaposition of natural and historical richness, standing out conspicuously in a vast arid and denuded tract of eastern Rajasthan, barely 14 km. from the town of Sawai Madhopur. It is spread over a highly undulating topography, varying from gentle to steep slopes, from flat-topped hills (Indala, Doodh-Bhat and Chiroli) of the Vindhyas to the conical hillocks and sharp ridges of the Aravallis, from wide and flat valleys (Lahpur, Nalghati, Khachida, Anantpur etc.) to narrow rocky gorges. An important geological feature, the “Great Boundary fault” where the Vindhyas were brought against the ancient Aravallis, passes from here.

Main Flora: Dhok Anogeissus pendula mixed with khair Acacia catechu, raunj, goya, chhela, pipal Ficus religiousa, vad, amaltas Cassia fistula, gurjan, siris saintha, gular, Tendu.

Main Fauna: Mammals : Tiger, leopard, caracal, ratel, jungle cat, chital, sambar, nilgai, chinkara, sloth bear, wild boar, jackal, hyaena, common langur, common fox.

Birds: 250 species of birds, some commonly seen are; Bonnelli’s Eagle, Sandgrouse, Pheasant tailed Jacana, Quail, Paradise Fly catcher etc.